Is Lebron taking all the spotlight ?

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Is Lebron taking the spotlight Do you feel the same way about this latest LeBron super team as you did when he formed his last one? Why or why not? (H/T to Ethan Skolnick at B/R) Steve Aschburner, NBA.com: Yeah, it’s exactly the same. Except, y’know, completely different. From the moment of The Decision, what LeBron JamesDwyane Wade and Chris Bosh did was more irritating and weenie. Three in-their-prime franchise players were ganging up on the league, preferring the shortcut of buddy ball when they should have been butting heads as rivals. Wade already had a ring, so he seemed greedy. Bosh was gladly accepting a diminished role, so he seemed needy. And James dumped his “hometown” team and their shared quest like some family man wigging out for a Corvette and a blonde. Had James chased a super team this time to L.A. or New York, that might have felt more like 2010 redux. But it’s Cleveland — Cleveland — the puppy-in-a-cage-with-Sarah-McLachlan-music of pro sports cities. James is different, too, a winner who can mentor and boost Kevin Love and Kyrie Irving to their first postseason appearances. So no, I don’t feel about this the way I did about the Heat four yearsago. Sounds to me like only cranky Miami partisans would. Jeff Caplan, NBA.com: This is different. There was so much anger toward LeBron over the way he left Cleveland, plus added outrage over these three superstars having planned their South Beach union — Magic Johnson never would have signed on with Larry Bird, by gosh! — that these guys became villains. People wanted to see them lose and watched hoping beyond hope that they would.This time, there’s no hate. LeBron went home to make amends for goodness sake. There’s no collusion. Name one reporter who ever put the names LeBron James and Kevin Love together prior to LeBron announcing his decision to go back to Cleveland. Their union is in the name of fortunate timing. But to the original point, the level of contempt toward LeBron fueled that thing and slowly he was able to reverse that by winning. The new Cavs could become like the old Lakers or Bulls — universally cheered (except by fans in direct rival cities). The “sports hate” element can add some real spice, but there’s just none of it this time around.Fran Blinebury, NBA.com: Yes, I feel all tingly, like soda bubbles going up my nose. Let’s face it. LeBron James could join Pink Floyd and play on the Dark Side of the Moon and everything he does/doesn’t do will draw gross overreaction in the age of Twitter. Of course, a large part of what the 2010-11 Heat perceived as unfair demands on them was self-inflicted. “Not one, not two, not three…” Dwayne Wade had won a championship and been MVP of The Finals. Chris Bosh was already a five-time All-Star. Kevin Love and Kyrie Irving have never played a single playoff game. LeBron, it seems, has learned his lesson and is preaching patience. So should we. But we won’t. Scott Howard-Cooper, NBA.com: Probably better. This doesn’t feel like the same circus as when LeBron went to Miami. There will be a white-hot spotlight and there will be issues along the way, but James is more mature now. He is home. Settled. When those issues come up, it won’t have that “the world is ending” feel. John Schuhmann, NBA.comNo. Even though there was clearly a handshake deal on the Kevin Love trade before LeBron announced that he was “coming home,” this still feels like the “coming home” part was more important than constructing a super team right away. We’ll still evaluate these Cavs like any championship contender and point out their shortcomings when they’re not playing like the best team in the league, but the motivation behind their construction, at least from my perspective, feels different than that of the Heat in 2010. Bringing one championship to Cleveland would mean more for LeBron than bringing two or three more to Miami. Sekou Smith, NBA.com: Same way. Like it or not LeBron, this is your life. Wherever you go the enormous expectations are sure to follow. I would argue that the 2010-11 Miami Heat were much better equipped to handle the rigors of the championship chase than a Cleveland Cavaliers team with two stars (Kevin Love and Kyrie Irving) who have never experienced the intense heat that is playoff pressure. I wasn’t convinced the Heat would measure up to the whole “not one, not two, not three” craziness. Lang Whitaker, NBA.com’s All Ball blogLeBron did a pretty good job, right from the start, of tamping down expectations. He obviously learned from the “Not one, not two…” speech in Miami, which never went away. So in that Sports Illustrated article he set the tone by noting it would take some time, that it wouldn’t happen right away. It reminds me of when college football coaches talk to the media the week before the game, and no matter who they’re playing, whether it’s an SEC powerhouse like UGA or the Sisters of the Poor, the coach always praises the opponent in an over-the-top manner, just to give them an out in case they lose. It was a nice try by ‘Bron, but I ain’t buying it. The Cavs and the Bulls are the class of the East. So yeah, expectations should be high for Cleveland.

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